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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I’m looking to buy a DB7. But before I do I would like to inform myself a bit.

Are they good/easy cars to own? What to look out for? Do they retain their value? Are they easy cars to sell (if it ever comes to it)?

Thanks in advance for your advice!
Hoping to be a proud Aston owner soon!
Kind regards,
Jelle
 

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I bought my first about a year ago, and I'll give you my $.02.

They were incredibly expensive cars, now approaching twenty years old, cobbled together with pieces from Ford's various parts bins, and hand built in limited quantities. At this point in their economic cycle, many have been owned by people who couldn't afford to maintain them as intended. In the US, the availability of service has been especially suspect, and even people who thought they were maintaining the cars, may not have been. You will pay a premium for a car with a meticulous service history, and I suspect those are also the cars that are going to hold their value the most. However, the cars aren't that complicated. The factory V12 is mated to a fairly standard transmission. The computers and wiring aren't that complicated and are generally available in repair. Wheels, tires, differential, brakes, etc. are often Jaguar parts or related and haven't proven to be that difficult to source. The interior leather, carpet, and wood paneling is incredibly expensive. Everything that says "Aston Martin" is incredibly expensive. Service is incredibly expensive. However, the counterpoint is that everyone doesn't show up at a party in one, they turn heads (to this day) as a rolling work of automotive art, and putting your foot in the V12 on a winding road with the top down is why man drives cars. Some stuff you can do. There is a well developed and passionate network of devotees. A lot of it you simply can't. Run from underbody or wheel well rust. Be carefull about V12 tapping sounds. Be really careful about something someone has "personalized". They aren't bad about stranding you on the side of the road (like some Brit cars) but they are prone to absolutely infuriating bad habits.

If you are looking for a great investment...that I can't tell you. They should go up...rare cars, V12's, a blast to drive...but who knows? I hear Pontiac Fieros are about to go up, and Buick Skylarks and a hundred other cars make better sense and would be a lot less money to own. If you want something that you can just sit in the garage and look at on an icy day; and a sound that Richard Wagner had in mind when he penned the Ride of the Valkyries; and you are comfortable with the fact that but for the car, you might actually have a retirement...you'll own it and smile, and simply not care. At some point I'll sell mine...and somebody will buy it at some price, but I don't think of the car as something I own as much as a piece of art for which I am a caretaker and I hope the next owner enjoys it one tenth as much as I do.
 

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I’m trying to sell mine now. It ain’t easy! I hate buying and selling cars, so I’d like to trade it in. The dealers I’ve talked to say that since it’s not listed in KBB, it has no value. If they take and sell it to someone who wants to finance it, the bank won’t loan on it since they don’t have a KBB listing. Of course they offer me an incredibly low $10-12k. Just today I found a listing for it in Hagerty’s where it ranges from $30k for good condition to $59k for mint. Basically, I believe they’re trying to steal the car. I may wait and take it down to the US Open at Pebble Beach in June or to Car Week in Carmel in August and sell it privately.
 

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WinstonC:

Hello, I would suggest you contact an Aston Martin Dealership and see if you couldn't place your car on a consignment basis. Forget about the Dealers who are hosing you with that KBB nonsense!

John Edwards
 

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Not sure what you have in the car or what you expect out, or what kind of shape it is in. All I can tell you is that a year or two ago, I regularly saw DB7 VVs listed in the high $20k's and selling in the mid to low $20k's with several selling in the high teens. Now, I am seeing more listing in the mid to high $30k's that seem to be selling privately in the high $20's. I'm a math guy, and follow these closely, but the sample size is small and there may be some apples/oranges problems. Having said that, I don't feel like they are collapsing.

Dealers prefer to take in cars that will move quickly, and when presented with niche automobiles, often bail out quickly rather than sit...hence the low offers. My guess is that these aren't traditional car lot fodder, and very few of these are traditionally bank financed (although I'm sure a lot are on HELOCs and such). As such, I would think that Autotrader, eBay and Craigslist (CL has a very active trading following, and you might even trade for something) would be your friend if you were trying to sell a daily driver and if it were something you could live without for a while, I'd look at something like Gateway Classic that would store and consign for you. Previous advice about consigning at AM would be great, especially if the car is a Hagerty 2 or so. Last week, a pristine 41k mile brown car in SoFla sold, no reserve, on eBay for $25k...which wasn't itself remarkable, but there were 53 bids, the bulk coming in over $20K, which I think is a reflection of at least some level of interest.

Make sure yours is presentable. Pass it through an interior leather/carpet shop, and a nice exterior clean, make sure all the lights, bells and buzzers are working, put together a service notebook, and run it up a social media flagpole...you might be surprised.
 
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