Aston Martin Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The part interchange thread indicates 2002 Jaguar XKR brakes fit the DB7 Vantage. Does that apply to the Jubilee edition cars as well?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Jaguar XJR (with the Brembo R1 brake option)., not the normal XJR.

Aston Martin changed the way the calipers mounted, the earlier DB7 Vantages (like mine) 2000 m.y. have what is called a radial mount that bolts to the caliper and upright, the later have mounting lugs cast in to the caliper , eliminating the need for a separate radial caliper mounting bracket.

The DB7 GT brakes use different slotted rotors and a different pad compound (an very expensive harder Pagid RS 4-2-1 compound)

I believe the Jubilee was an appearance option and didn't use the GT brakes, unless the car was specially ordered with them, so your car being a 2003 should have drilled brake discs and the Brembo calipers with the cast in mounts (like the Jaguars used)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Try to make sure the usual DB7 Vantage problem areas have been attended to: Coils, Fuel Pumps and that the engine has been regulary serviced and hasn't developed the ticking noise that some are afflicted with.
Front end bushings can wear and come apart (the subframe mounts) causing banging noises ,uneven tyre wear and wandering steering. Upper shock bushings can also cause noise If worn out and are a cheap easy fix.
Don't be afraid to buy one from a private owner, as long as you have the car checked over by a competent mechanic and have evidence of regular servicing.
Had mine for three years now, no major problems (coils and pumps done by PO) , just some check engine lights (slow O2 sensor response) which is typical for these cars If you don't drive them hard enough.

Good luck,
Wayne
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Try to make sure the usual DB7 Vantage problem areas have been attended to: Coils, Fuel Pumps and that the engine has been regulary serviced and hasn't developed the ticking noise that some are afflicted with.
Front end bushings can wear and come apart (the subframe mounts) causing banging noises ,uneven tyre wear and wandering steering. Upper shock bushings can also cause noise If worn out and are a cheap easy fix.
Don't be afraid to buy one from a private owner, as long as you have the car checked over by a competent mechanic and have evidence of regular servicing.
Had mine for three years now, no major problems (coils and pumps done by PO) , just some check engine lights (slow O2 sensor response) which is typical for these cars If you don't drive them hard enough.

Good luck,
Wayne
+1 Wayne, mine has the latter Brembo brake option from new fitted and when I upgraded my calipers from black to red, Rob @ HWM told me my car had the later modded calipers fitted so I know this now.

I have the normal drilled discs and not the grooved type found on the GT models of the DB7 and all my pads are new EBC yellow stuff and I took out the new EBC red stuff ones and sold em very quickly BTW.

Like Wayne said, don't be afraid to buy one but if you don't want mega bills then try a I6 model firsts instead of the V12.

Regards,:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the guidance gents.

How can one tell if the coils are going out? I presume it will throw a check engine light and give a code indicating coils?

Are the replacement coils better, or will changing them be a regular, (if infrequent) procedure?

I've only driven one of these cars. It was intoxicating enough that I'm continuing to give it thought. From first impressions I liked the short/low dash. The visibility forward seemed good, making it easy to drive. I imagine the newer V8V and DB9's would be a touch more challenging to pilot around town.
I also liked the touchtronic automatic. Shift times were a bit slow but positive. I'm curious how a manual would compare.
As for handling it tossed around a bit on rougher roads but none of the bang and crash of pure sports cars. No squeaks and creaks either so the chassis must be reasonably stiff. The quick steering ratio was enjoyable too.
And finally the sound of the engine, not surprisingly one of the best features.

Hmm, it seems I'm talking myself into this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Thanks for the guidance gents.

How can one tell if the coils are going out? I presume it will throw a check engine light and give a code indicating coils?

Are the replacement coils better, or will changing them be a regular, (if infrequent) procedure?

I've only driven one of these cars. It was intoxicating enough that I'm continuing to give it thought. From first impressions I liked the short/low dash. The visibility forward seemed good, making it easy to drive. I imagine the newer V8V and DB9's would be a touch more challenging to pilot around town.
I also liked the touchtronic automatic. Shift times were a bit slow but positive. I'm curious how a manual would compare.
As for handling it tossed around a bit on rougher roads but none of the bang and crash of pure sports cars. No squeaks and creaks either so the chassis must be reasonably stiff. The quick steering ratio was enjoyable too.
And finally the sound of the engine, not surprisingly one of the best features.

Hmm, it seems I'm talking myself into this.
The coils and plugs are he worst job of all on the DB7 vantage and the most expensive too. Factor in around £2000-£2500 for this job at a main dealer or specialist and its a pain in the ass to do. You would get a fault code/light and the engine would run rough too and misfire if it was bad or more than 1 coil had failed. The 12 cylinders can carry one another quite well so it could go un noticed until a fault light trips up.

Mine are done thankfully and they need to be done every 45k miles so if you do go for a V12 then make well sure these have recently been done or haggle the price way down.

Aircon systems too are problematic and can run in to MEGA bills if faulty or failed.

Make sure you look at a lot before you buy one to be 100% sure its what you want. I did and eventually found the right car with a full service record and low miles and a full spec to boot.

You will also need a nice wad of cash to get a decent car as values are slowly climbing now so expect to pay 20-30k for a minter nowadays unless your lucky enough to find someone desperate to need the cash and sell cheaper.

Remember, cheapest is not always best and most expensive is not also best either.:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Thanks for the guidance gents.

How can one tell if the coils are going out? I presume it will throw a check engine light and give a code indicating coils?

Are the replacement coils better, or will changing them be a regular, (if infrequent) procedure?

I've only driven one of these cars. It was intoxicating enough that I'm continuing to give it thought. From first impressions I liked the short/low dash. The visibility forward seemed good, making it easy to drive. I imagine the newer V8V and DB9's would be a touch more challenging to pilot around town.
I also liked the touchtronic automatic. Shift times were a bit slow but positive. I'm curious how a manual would compare.
As for handling it tossed around a bit on rougher roads but none of the bang and crash of pure sports cars. No squeaks and creaks either so the chassis must be reasonably stiff. The quick steering ratio was enjoyable too.
And finally the sound of the engine, not surprisingly one of the best features.

Hmm, it seems I'm talking myself into this.
If the coils are failing it will throw a misfire code(s) and indicate which cylinder(s) are failing.
It may also show similar codes when one of the two fuel pumps starts to go or fails, best to check fuel pressure at the rails before assuming its one or the other.

As Brendan mentioned A/C non functioning can be a problem, mine was in-op when I purchased, but was fixed by charging with 3 cans of Dura-Cool refirgerant (it slow leaks from the compressor front seal), I just add refrigerant occasionally.

I have a manual 6 speed Volante, it a quick car and seat of the pants feels as fast as a pre-production manual DB9 and Vanquish (old model , non S) I had also driven.

The DB9 manual is probably ultimately the faster car by a tenth or two , but back to back the skill of the driver would come into play 0:60.

The autos are quick also , but manual is the way to go for ultimate driving fun and performance, and the redline on the manual is higher (7000 rpm) as is top speed (on coupe) 185 mph instead of limited 155 mph on auto coupes and Volantes.

Driving the DB7 Vantage delivers more of an old school performance feel, akin to the Ferrari Daytona's of the '70s and AC Cobras, If you need more luxury /driver aids the DB9 is the way to go.

Autos don't have expensive clutch to wear/replace (or release slaves that leak/fail) are more relaxing to drive in traffic, and easier to drink coffee in.

Structure wise , the DB7 isn't as rigid as the DB9 , on a rough road you can feel the car flexing around, but I wouldn't say its excessive.

Engine definitely sounds better with a factory sports exhaust , modded or aftermarket one, the standard exhaust is very quiet for a performance car.

Don't discount the Volante , on a hot day with the top down it delivers a great driving experience, and gives an enhanced impression of speed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
If the coils are failing it will throw a misfire code(s) and indicate which cylinder(s) are failing.
It may also show similar codes when one of the two fuel pumps starts to go or fails, best to check fuel pressure at the rails before assuming its one or the other.

As Brendan mentioned A/C non functioning can be a problem, mine was in-op when I purchased, but was fixed by charging with 3 cans of Dura-Cool refirgerant (it slow leaks from the compressor front seal), I just add refrigerant occasionally.

I have a manual 6 speed Volante, it a quick car and seat of the pants feels as fast as a pre-production manual DB9 and Vanquish (old model , non S) I had also driven.

The DB9 manual is probably ultimately the faster car by a tenth or two , but back to back the skill of the driver would come into play 0:60.

The autos are quick also , but manual is the way to go for ultimate driving fun and performance, and the redline on the manual is higher (7000 rpm) as is top speed (on coupe) 185 mph instead of limited 155 mph on auto coupes and Volantes.

Driving the DB7 Vantage delivers more of an old school performance feel, akin to the Ferrari Daytona's of the '70s and AC Cobras, If you need more luxury /driver aids the DB9 is the way to go.

Autos don't have expensive clutch to wear/replace (or release slaves that leak/fail) are more relaxing to drive in traffic, and easier to drink coffee in.

Structure wise , the DB7 isn't as rigid as the DB9 , on a rough road you can feel the car flexing around, but I wouldn't say its excessive.

Engine definitely sounds better with a factory sports exhaust , modded or aftermarket one, the standard exhaust is very quiet for a performance car.

Don't discount the Volante , on a hot day with the top down it delivers a great driving experience, and gives an enhanced impression of speed.
+1 Wayne albeit the top speed on the Volante is listed as 165 mph as opposed to the coupe 185 mph which is still bloody fast if you dare to go that far.

Ive taken my Volante so far up to 150 mph ( naughty boy I know ) but you do have to try if you can!!! :D, I tried many cars before I decided a Volante was the way to go for me personally and as Wayne says it makes for superb driving in summer with the roof down and a true posers car with it!!!!:cool:

sports zorst sound great and mine is also a standard system modded like Waynes and it sounds awesome for a fraction of the cost for a AM or quicksilver item!!!!:rolleyes:.

My car is a very late 2003/4 car and one of the last made too which makes it very rare indeed and desirable albeit they cost a lot more if in excellent order but you get what you pay for at the end of the day don't you;).

If you have lots to spend then you can search for the very best available but don't leave it too late as prices are on the up for these cars.

Regards
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Brendan, Are you saying a good car can be had for 20-30,000 pounds? I haven't looked into your market but I would have guessed they'd be higher. In any event if the market is firming up it's good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
I'm not sure if the car I tried (2003 V12) had stock exhaust or not, but I liked the sound. Not sure I'd want it louder.

What options exist for lowering these cars. I doesn't need much, perhaps 20mm or so. Looking underneath I can see it can't go down much before the exhaust would drag on speed bumps.

The headlights appeared to be fogged up. Can the headlight covers be removed for cleaning on the inside. I believe I read there's a ventilation tube from the headlights to the climate control system that demists them when the car's running. Is this correct.

James
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top